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We welcome inquiries from highly qualified scientists at all levels from graduate students to senior staff scientists interested in joining our research team and collaborative network to study the genomics of human disease.

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Postdoctoral Fellow Positions available for computational biologists or bioinformatic specialists at the Postdoctoral Fellow or Staff Scientist level in the Center for Human Genetic Research at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, as well as the Program in Medical and Population Genetics at the Broad Institute. Projects involve: (1) structural variation sequencing for population genetics, neurodevelopmental and psychiatric genetic disease association, and genetic diagnostics. (2) Functional genomic studies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) genes, including integration of genomic datasets such RNA-seq and ChIP-seq generated by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in iPS-derived neuronal cells, extensive functional genomic studies of chromosomal abnormalities in human disease, and mapping of the effects of genomic variation on chromosome structure, nuclear interactions, and long-range regulator effects. Positions include close collaborations with laboratories within MGH, Harvard Medical School, and the Broad Institute. Staff Scientist positions will also be considered for the Genomics and Technology Core. The ideal candidate will have an interdisciplinary background in bioinformatics & computational biology, advanced expertise in the analysis and interpretation of next-generation sequencing data focusing on RNA-seq and CHiP-seq and its integration with other “omics” data sources, or demonstrated expertise in human genetics and bioinformatics; good programming skills; and advanced knowledge of statistical methods. Required Skills A Ph.D. in human genetics, quantitative genetics, computational biology, bioinformatics, computer science, or mathematics. All candidates should provide a cover letter and academic curriculum vitae or resume to Dr. Talkowski (talkowski@chgr.mgh.harvard.edu)
Research Position in Computational Genomics: Positions are available for computational biologists or bioinformatic specialists in the Talkowski laboratory in the Center for Human Genetic Research at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, as well as the Program in Medical and Population Genetics at the Broad Institute. Projects involve a wide range of collaborations including studies related to autism spectrum disorder, prenatal diagnostics and newborn screening, intellectual disability, schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, familial dysautonomia, dystonia, Alzheimer’s disease, and congenital arhinia. Candidates will have the opportunity to work in a unique translational genomics environment that will integrate computational genomics, technology development, and an advanced molecular genomics laboratory. Candidates will have significant independence, with appointments to MGH, HMS, and the Broad Institute, and will interact with collaborators at all three institutions. The ideal candidate will have an interdisciplinary background in bioinformatics & computational biology, advanced expertise in the analysis and interpretation of next-generation sequencing data focusing (DNA sequencing, RNAseq, ChIP-seq) and its integration with other “omics” data, or demonstrated expertise in human genetics and bioinformatics; good programming skills; and advanced knowledge of statistical methods. Required Skills A Ph.D. in human genetics, quantitative genetics, computational biology, bioinformatics, computer science, and statistics or mathematics is strongly preferred, although a truly exceptional candidate with a Master’s degree or Bachelor’s degree in these fields may be considered. Ability to program in Python, Perl and R. Expertise with Unix systems and parallel computing. Familiarity with genomics analysis tools. Excellent communication skills, both written and oral. To apply, send a cover letter and resume or curriculum vitae directly to Dr. Talkowski (talkowski@chgr.mgh.harvard.edu)